Topics

Change the club name?


heinrf@...
 

I'm only a lone voice in the woods, but I like QOC. 
Sincerely,
Robert, Christina, Allison, and Leah Hein


Jon <djon@planet-save.com> <djon@...>
 

As some of you will have noticed, Tom Strat this afternoon fired the
first salvo in the discussion of the club name promised on the front
page of the latest Formline. To the rest of you, you certainly can
ignore the discussion or follow it by reading messages posted to the
group online rather than in your email but I hope it is obvious that a
more lively discussion would be possible if a large proportion of the
membership were to receive messages discussing the topic at mre or
less the same time. My offer to change the delivery option on request
for anyone who doesn't want to mess with Yahoo themselves still
stands.




That said, I think lack of awareness of orienteering in general is
much more of an obstacle than the perception of a military connection
or a dearth of suitable people who would enjoy orienteering. With
apologies to Jeff Haskell, the adventure races certainly seem able to
get people to pay quite enormous sums to get more lost in worse
weather than we ever will. Unfortunately, creating society-wide
awareness of orienteering is rather more difficult than changing the
club name.




Personally, I would be happy to keep the name as is. I'd be happy to
keep the name as is but use the "National Capital Orienteers" alias
for publicity purposes (slightly confusing as this might be).
However, if we end up bound and determined to change the official club
name, I think there is merit in trying to find a name that is (a) more
descriptive of what we do to people who have no idea what
"orienteering" is and, if possible, (b) more interesting.




To stimulate discussion, I've conducted an admittedly less than
comprehensive survey of O club names in the English speaking world,
excluding Ireland (no good explanation, just laziness). British clubs
seem to be named almost exclusively in geographic terms, i.e. "East
Wessex Orienteering Club" would be an utterly typical example. This
pattern is also dominant in Australia (though the place names there at
least tend to be slightly more interesting to the unaccustomed ear)
and the United States. Perhaps slightly less dominant in Canada.
Leading to the following list of some of the more interesting
(different, at any rate) club names in North America:




Edmonton Overlanders Orienteering Club (EOOC)


Foothills Wanderers Orienteering Club (FWOC)


Rocky Mountain Heckawees - damned if I know what a Heckawee is


Forest Adventurers of York (FAY)


Coureurs de Bois Orienteering Club (Grand Falls) - French for "Runners
of the Woods O Club", the term is normally used to refer to the people
who explored most of Eastern Canada by canoe and would be understood
even by most unilingual Anglophone Canadians


Loup Garou Orienteering Club (LGO) - French for "Werewolf OC"


Ramblers O Club


Victorienteers (VICO)


Viking Orienteers


Falcon Orienteering Club


Fredericton Foxes Orienteering Club (FFOC)




Possum Trot OC (PTOC)


Badger OC (BGR)


Blue Star Komplex (BSK)


Up North Orienteers (UNO)


Chuckanut Orienteers (CHUKO)


Sacajawea OC (SACO)


Vulcan OC (VOC)


Urban Trails Trips for Kids South Florida (UTTK)


Backwoods OK (BOK)






Should we choose to officially change the club name, I think we could
do worse than pick something easily comprehensible to the general
public. The possibilities uppermost in my mind at the moment run
along the lines of "Capital Forest Navigators" or "Capital Forest
Adventurers" but I'd at least consider anything in the form "word
designating the geographic area we operate in" followed by "noun
describing the sort of area in which we hold events" followed by "verb
suggesting an exciting, challenging, adventurous activity". Depending
on the words chosen, I suppose "noun" "verb" "of geographic area"
might be more euphonious.




Have fun at Little Bennett (in my absence, regrettably).




Jon


Ferguson Dr. Charles M <fergusoncm@...>
 

QOC has such an exemplary national reputation coupled with a history that
goes back to the origins of orienteering in the United States that I would
hate to see the name changed to lose that historical connection and national
reputation in order to be more geographically correct...What is gained?
What is lost? I think the latter outweighs the former. Thanks for
listening.
Chuck Ferguson
USOF President


Charles M. Ferguson, Ph.D.
Vice President of Academic Affairs
Marine Corps University
Phone: (703) 784-5043
DSN: 278-5043
FAX: (703) 784-1271

-----Original Message-----
From: Jon <djon@...> [mailto:djon@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 30, 2003 6:56 PM
To: Quantico_Orienteering_Club@...
Subject: [Quantico_Orienteering_Club] Change the club name?

As some of you will have noticed, Tom Strat this afternoon fired the
first salvo in the discussion of the club name promised on the front
page of the latest Formline. To the rest of you, you certainly can
ignore the discussion or follow it by reading messages posted to the
group online rather than in your email but I hope it is obvious that a
more lively discussion would be possible if a large proportion of the
membership were to receive messages discussing the topic at mre or
less the same time. My offer to change the delivery option on request
for anyone who doesn't want to mess with Yahoo themselves still
stands.




That said, I think lack of awareness of orienteering in general is
much more of an obstacle than the perception of a military connection
or a dearth of suitable people who would enjoy orienteering. With
apologies to Jeff Haskell, the adventure races certainly seem able to
get people to pay quite enormous sums to get more lost in worse
weather than we ever will. Unfortunately, creating society-wide
awareness of orienteering is rather more difficult than changing the
club name.




Personally, I would be happy to keep the name as is. I'd be happy to
keep the name as is but use the "National Capital Orienteers" alias
for publicity purposes (slightly confusing as this might be).
However, if we end up bound and determined to change the official club
name, I think there is merit in trying to find a name that is (a) more
descriptive of what we do to people who have no idea what
"orienteering" is and, if possible, (b) more interesting.




To stimulate discussion, I've conducted an admittedly less than
comprehensive survey of O club names in the English speaking world,
excluding Ireland (no good explanation, just laziness). British clubs
seem to be named almost exclusively in geographic terms, i.e. "East
Wessex Orienteering Club" would be an utterly typical example. This
pattern is also dominant in Australia (though the place names there at
least tend to be slightly more interesting to the unaccustomed ear)
and the United States. Perhaps slightly less dominant in Canada.
Leading to the following list of some of the more interesting
(different, at any rate) club names in North America:




Edmonton Overlanders Orienteering Club (EOOC)


Foothills Wanderers Orienteering Club (FWOC)


Rocky Mountain Heckawees - damned if I know what a Heckawee is


Forest Adventurers of York (FAY)


Coureurs de Bois Orienteering Club (Grand Falls) - French for "Runners
of the Woods O Club", the term is normally used to refer to the people
who explored most of Eastern Canada by canoe and would be understood
even by most unilingual Anglophone Canadians


Loup Garou Orienteering Club (LGO) - French for "Werewolf OC"


Ramblers O Club


Victorienteers (VICO)


Viking Orienteers


Falcon Orienteering Club


Fredericton Foxes Orienteering Club (FFOC)




Possum Trot OC (PTOC)


Badger OC (BGR)


Blue Star Komplex (BSK)


Up North Orienteers (UNO)


Chuckanut Orienteers (CHUKO)


Sacajawea OC (SACO)


Vulcan OC (VOC)


Urban Trails Trips for Kids South Florida (UTTK)


Backwoods OK (BOK)






Should we choose to officially change the club name, I think we could
do worse than pick something easily comprehensible to the general
public. The possibilities uppermost in my mind at the moment run
along the lines of "Capital Forest Navigators" or "Capital Forest
Adventurers" but I'd at least consider anything in the form "word
designating the geographic area we operate in" followed by "noun
describing the sort of area in which we hold events" followed by "verb
suggesting an exciting, challenging, adventurous activity". Depending
on the words chosen, I suppose "noun" "verb" "of geographic area"
might be more euphonious.




Have fun at Little Bennett (in my absence, regrettably).




Jon









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GF <gford@eudoramail.com> <gford@...>
 

I think in the 3 years I've been with the club, once I've been asked
by friends or newcomers about a military connection. The other 50 is
more like, what the heck is a orienteering? Traveling to a Rogaine
in New York last year their was always instant recognition of QOC and
the Quantico club.

So unless the plan is to add a definition of orienteering like "the
sport that is like that boy-scout thing with the compass that can be
done as a race or just for fun in the woods" or we can find something
easier to spell than Quantico, I'd like to keep our root name and the
history. George Ford


pdickison@...
 

I am perhaps in the minority about changing the name, but I strongly feel
that we should not change it (Quantico OC for most uses -- it's historical
value alone is wonderful, as one of the oldest o' clubs in North America;
National Capital Orienteers for other uses as we've already put that on
several maps and advertised that way) but we absolutely should not abandon
the term "orienteering" in our name. I've been told that outside the
adventure racing world most runners/hikers etc STILL haven't heard of
orienteering, but I a) am skeptical of that and b) think with adventure
racing expanding and using the term orienteering, it will only enhance our
image.

In the March 2003 issue of Running Times, in their montly "Hit the Trails"
column, the topic is winter adventure racing. Here are a few quotes:

" In the last few years...adventure racing has become a year-round
endeavor... These races combine any number of winter activities, including
skiing (back-country, skate and classic), snowshoeing, ice skating,
orienteering, snow mountain biking, ropes activities and running."

" Navigation is a fundamental factor in most adventure races. Teams joke that
winter orienteering is a non-issue because all you need to do is follow the
leader's tracks, but courses can cross snowless stretches or... Having
dependable map and compass skills is crucial, especially when an error in
course finding can result in hours spent out in the cold."

The second quote, which implies the meaning of orienteering to anyone who may
not already know, comes six long paragraphs after the first mention of the
sport. I think anyone in adventure racing, and even the casual fan of the
fast-growing sport, has at least a general idea that "orienteering" is
navigating.

My 2c as a stick-in-the-mud change-hater.
Peggy D.


nvf0730 <nvf0730@yahoo.com> <nvf0730@...>
 

One thing I like about QOC is it's easy to find in the results
listings for the big meets. I'll bet that orienteers from other
clubs associate it very readily with this club and its hot
competitors.

Proposition: a person who wants to learn about orienteering nowadays
is likely to look it up online. With keywords "orienteering dc"
Google produces this at the top of the list:

<headline & link> Quantico Orienteering Club (Virginia, Maryland and
Washington, DC ...
The Quantico Orienteering Club welcomes all ages & skill levels to
the sport of orienteering. Come explore the outdoors with compass &
map!
Description: Information, schedule of events, newsletter, contact
information, and maps.

A search via Yahoo also yields a link for QOC at the top. Someone
going through USOF sees a dot on DC leading in one hop to QOC. I
looked on the web myself before moving here, sometime in the winter
of 97-98. The word Quantico confused me for as long as it took to
find the QOC website; from there it's clear that QOC *is*
orienteering in the DC metro.

Coming from elsewhere, my association with the word Quantico was not
with the Marines but rather with the FBI Academy, for which my only
mental picture was Jodie Foster running through the woods --- not
bad...

Quantico has history, character, the letter Q, and, lucky for us, the
US Marine Corps. "National Capital Orienteering" is vanilla.


Cliff_Hamal@...
 

Good comments by all, with a clear preference for tradition. As a newer
member, I readily defer to others on most issues, but I have to say that
when I first heard about QOC I was a bit confused by the name and the
military connection. It comes up when I introduce others to the sport, and
while it is easy to explain one-on-one, I wonder how many that read about
the activities get confused or put off. Like many of you, I'd hate to walk
away from the heritage. And, I really think that having two different
names is only going to lead to long-term confusion. So, in the spirit of
compromise, how about:

Capital Area's Quantico Orienteering Club

It's a mouthful, but you can use whatever part of it fits the situation.
We stay QOC to those in the "O" community. I think it substantially
softens the "look" of a military or FBI connection, but of course that is
for you to judge. It will also add to the length of any news article,
which, as any publicist will tell you, is a key measure of success. By the
way, I had absolutely nothing to do with the renaming of a local airport.

Cliff Hamal